Charles F. Cook

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From “Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for Charles F. Cook, who resided at Oceana, West Virginia:

Was born in Wyoming county, Jan. 3, 1843; was married to Lucinda O’Neal in Raleigh county, Nov. 12, 1868; their union has been blessed with nine children, eight of whom are at the present time residing with their parents: Edgar, Anna Laurie (died when three years old), Charles W., Nannie G., Marshall, Addie P., Perry C., George W., and Alice L. His father, John Cook, was born in Wyoming county, W.Va., June 20, 1818, and died there May 25, 1887. Mary A. Jarrell was born in Boone county, W.Va., March 8, 1818, and died in Wyoming county, March 10, 1873; they were married May 5, 1831. Mr. Cook owns a beautiful home, situated on Huff’s Creek, Wyoming county; he also has other estates, consisting of extensive coal and timber lands. He is descended from one of the oldest and best families of that county; is a man of high moral character, and has the esteem of all who know him. His post office address is Oceana, W.Va.

Source: Dr. R.A. Brock, Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888 (Richmond, VA: H.H. Hardesty, Publisher, 1888), p. 825-826.

The Life of Pioneers 12

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This history of early life in Logan County, West Virginia, was written by Howard and Daisy Adams. Howard (1906-1976) and Daisy (b.1915) were children of Major and Belle Dora Adams of Trace Fork of Harts Creek. Titled “The life of pioneers during the latter half of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the 19th century” and written in the late 1960s or early 1970s, their history marks the only known attempt by local people to reconstruct the story of pioneer life. This final part of the history includes information regarding sugar-making.

So the time of year for sugar making has arrived. You see, the sugar and syrup supplied on the farm came from big sugar maple trees. This operation began usually in the early spring and lasted about 30 days. First the trees had to be tapped. To do this a large 2 inch auger was used to bore holes at a 45 degree angle downward in the tree or if no auger was available deep cup like notches were cut in the trees with an ax. Then a small auger was used to bore holes slanting upward into the holes made by boring with larger auger or ax. Now a little hollow piece of wood called a spline was needed. To get this elder bushes were used. A piece about a foot long with the ___ removed forming a pipe. This was driven up ___ in the small holes in the tree. he spline extended out from the tree far enough to reach buckets or troughs. The juice from the trees poured out through the splines into the troughs. The troughs were made by cutting down a buckeye or basswood tree about 16 inches in diameter and sawing in block about 3 feet long. These blocks were splint in halves and each half or the flat side chopped or dug out as it was called. A foot adz was used for this operation. These troughs, which held at least 5 gallons were placed under the splines in trees to catch the sap or juice. They usually had 75 to 100 trees tapped. Several large kettles were set in rock and clay furnaces. Also the molasses pan was used, too. The sugar water or juice from the trees was carried and poured in these kettles and the evaporator pan. Fires were built and it was boiled in to syrup and sugar. Boy, this took a lot of work and long hours. I’ve heard Granny tell many times about sugar making time. I have eaten some of this sugar and syrup and it was sure good. Even if the old pioneer lived a hard life I’ll say one thing: He sure had better food than we have now.

Berry L. Cook

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From “Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for Berry L. Cook, who resided at Oceana, West Virginia:

The subject of this sketch, was born in this county Jan. 5, 1867, and in Logan county, W.Va., Sept. 20, 1888, he was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Justice. The issue of this union has been one son, Alfred Lee, born July 17, 1889. Mrs. Cook’s father is Thomas Justice, who was born in Logan county, W.Va., June 15, 1834, and her mother, whose maiden name was Ingobe Bailey, born in this county Jan. 29, 1832, both of whom are living. Mr. Cook is a farmer, and his post office address is Oceana, W.Va.

Source: Dr. R.A. Brock, Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888 (Richmond, VA: H.H. Hardesty, Publisher, 1888), p. 825.

Albert William Cook

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From “Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for Albert William Cook, who resided at Oceana, West Virginia:

Second son of James B. and Matilda (Shannon) Cook, was born July 19, 1861 at Oceana, W.Va. His father was born Sept. 11, 1826, in Wyoming county, W.Va. (then Logan county, Va.), of a family that has been long seated in this section; the ancestor, John Cook, came from England and made the first settlement about 1878 near Oceana, in what is now Wyoming county. His mother was also a native of Logan county, Va., now Wyoming county, W.Va., born Nov. 7, 1836. On Feb. 18, 1885, A.W. Cook was united in marriage with Ollie Ellender Bailey, the marriage being solemnized at Bear Spring Branch, Wyoming county; she was born there March 26, 1867. The result of this union is one living son, Dennis Bailey, born Oct. 3, 1889; they lost their first-born, Delia, on Feb. 5, 1886, aged one month and 11 days. Mrs. Cook’s parents are David C. and L. Jane (Lambert) Bailey, the father born here April 4, 1843, and the mother on April 3, 1849, in Tazewell county, Va. Of twelve children, nine sons and three daughters, Mrs. Cook is the oldest. In connection with his mercantile pursuits, Mr. Cook was appointed postmaster June 11, 1889, at Oceana, W.Va., and as proof of his accommodating efficiency toward the public, he has furnished the office at his own expense a handsome cabinet of government lock-boxes and cause the office to be designated a money-order office. The amount of mail matter received and sent from this office is indicative of the prosperity of the section. Mr. Cook’s post office and residence is Oceana, W.Va.

Source: Dr. R.A. Brock, Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888 (Richmond, VA: H.H. Hardesty, Publisher, 1888), p. 825.

William Claypool

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From “Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for William Claypool, who resided at Cyclone, West Virginia:

Was born in Greenbrier county Feb. 28, 1832; having removed to Logan county, W.Va., he there married Amanda Buchanan Nov. 22, 1874. Of this union have been born: John, March 22, 1876; Mary, Feb. 20, 1879; George R., Sept. 24, 1882; Roscoe, June 17, 1888; they all live with their parents at their beautiful home situated on Huff’s creek, Logan county. Their father is a good citizen, honored and respected by all who know him. John Claypool, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Tazewell county, Va., Jan. 12, 1798, and died Feb. 20, 1879, in Logan county; they left five children: William, George, Elizabeth, Levi, and Robert, all of whom are now living. Mr. William Claypool’s post office is Cyclone, Logan county, W.Va.

Source: Dr. R.A. Brock, Virginia and Virginians, 1606-1888 (Richmond, VA: H.H. Hardesty, Publisher, 1888), p. 824.

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