Peach Creek YMCA (1928)

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Peach Creek Y is Thriving LB 03.06.1928 1

Logan (WV) Banner, 6 March 1928.

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Democratic Party Intimidation in Logan County, WV (1924)

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Political history for Logan County, West Virginia, during the 1920s was particularly eventful; it included the latter years of Sheriff Don Chafin’s rule, the Mine Wars (“armed march”), Republican Party ascendancy, and the rise of Republican sheriffs Tennis and Joe Hatfield. What follows are selected primary source documents relating to this period:

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

HUNTINGTON DIVISION

Before the undersigned authority this day personally came FRANK BELL, who after being by me first duly sworn, deposes and says that he resides at Taplin, Logan County, in said District; that he is a contractor in the mines at Cora, Logan County. That Lee Belcher, Deputy sheriff came to affiant’s employees yesterday and told affiant’s employees that affiant was a Republican and that he “was going to get him.” That on last night they fired several shots all around affiant’s house and some shots into affiant’s house, some of them kept parading and firing pistols around the walls of the house all night, and affiant did not sleep any, but kept his clothes on all night.

That affiant looked out and saw some of the men and knew one of them to be Tom Chafin, Deputy Sheriff.

Frank Bell

Taken, subscribed and sworn to before me this the 6th day of November, 1924.

Ira P. Hager

United States Commissioner as aforesaid.

***

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

HUNTINGTON DIVISION

Before the undersigned authority, Ira P. Hager, a United States Commissioner in and for said District, personally appeared this day Annie Meade who after being by me first duly sworn, says: That on election day, November 4th, 1924, she voted a Republican Ticket at Cherry Tree Bottom, and that after affiant voted W.E. White, Jailor of Logan County, and John T. Gore, a Deputy Sheriff of Logan County, and John Harris, Constable of Logan District, and John Parmer, whose business is unknown to affiant, followed affiant down the street to the home of Charley Stollings, where affiant stopped, and they ordered affiant to get off the public highway. I was then standing in front of Charley Stollings’s house on the hard road. They then said, “If you open your mouth we will take you and put you in jail on your head.” I answered Squire White by telling him that he would not do it. Deputy John T. Gore then said, “You will see if I do not do it.” They then abused me for voting the Republican ticket.

Affiant is forty-four years of age.

Anna Meade

Taken, subscribed and sworn to before me this the 7th day of November, 1924.

Ira P. Hager

United States Commissioner as aforesaid.

Joshua Butcher Deed to John G. Butcher (1854)

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Joshua Butcher to John G. Butcher Deed 1

Deed Book C, page ___, Logan County Clerk’s Office, Logan, WV. Note: References timber.

Joshua Butcher to John G. Butcher Deed 3

Deed Book C, page ___, Logan County Clerk’s Office, Logan, WV.

Halloween in Huntington, WV (1899)

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From the Huntington Advertiser of Huntington, WV, comes this letter from “a tax payer” regarding Halloween, dated October 31, 1899:

EDITOR ADVERTISER:

The observance of the evening of October 31st, in Huntington, seems to have sadly deteriorated, or at least is very different from that in the balance of the world. The old time pleasantness and superstitions connected with “Hallow eve,” are lost sight of here, and in their stead are introduced drunkenness and vandalism. The night is made hideous. Women and children terrorized, property wantonly destroyed and life endangered. The night is looked forward to with dread. Now this is all wrong, and some vigorous measures should be taken to protect citizens and taxpayers from the outrages committed on this night in the past few years. Let the city give us the protection we are entitled to. Put on a special police force sufficiently strong for the purpose. $150 or $200 had better be thus invested than to have this much or more property maliciously destroyed and life made miserable besides. Nay, more than this may be averted. A man’s house is his castle, and if the authorities are inadequate to protect him, and he is subjected to the outrages heretofore perpetrated, he may be forced to protect himself, and some serious tragedy result, which under the circumstances the law can only justify. It is to be hoped the authorities will take action in the matter, and lawless individuals take warning in time.

A TAX PAYER.

Source: Huntington (WV) Advertiser, 31 October 1899.

Sunday School Children at the Methodist Episcopal Church South in Logan, WV (1914)

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Sunday School, M.E. Church South LB 07.03.1914 1.JPG

Sunday School Children Before County Convention, Logan (WV) Banner, 3 July 1914. The Methodist Church split in 1844 primarily over the issue of slavery and reunited in 1939. In 1968, it merged with additional splinter organizations to form the United Methodist Church.

Democratic Party Intimidation in Logan County, WV (1924)

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Political history for Logan County, West Virginia, during the 1920s was particularly eventful; it included the latter years of Sheriff Don Chafin’s rule, the Mine Wars (“armed march”), Republican Party ascendancy, and the rise of Republican sheriffs Tennis and Joe Hatfield. What follows are selected primary source documents relating to this period:

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

HUNTINGTON DIVISION

Before the undersigned authority, Ira P. Hager, a United States Commissioner in and for said county and State, personally appeared this day Mattie Marley, who after being by me first duly sworn, deposes and says:

That she resides at Kistler, Logan County, in said District; that on or about the 2nd day of November, A.D., 1924, at Kistler, in said District, Charley Gore, Deputy Sheriff said to affiant that after the election he was going to give some of them hell; that he was then in affiant’s house, and pulled his revolvers and said that if we would not permit him to give a supper there he knew of plenty of houses where he could get a free supper. He also said when he put his pistol back into his pocket that if his special did not get them his machine gun would.

Mattie Marley

Taken, subscribed and sworn to before me this the 3rd day of November, A.D., 1924.

Ira P. Hager

United States Commissioner as aforesaid.

Witnesses:

Will Lancaster

Pearl Anderson

Malinda Carlton

***

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

HUNTINGTON DIVISION

Before me, Ira P. Hager, the undersigned a United States Commissioner in and for said District, personally appeared this day John Morgan, who after being by me first duly sworn, deposes and says:

That affiant voted a Republican ticket on election day November 4th, 1924, and H.S. Walker, receiving clerk tore the same up and destroyed it. That there was no justification for his destroying said ballot. Affiant further says that the other election officers of the Junior High School Precinct saw the said Walker destroy said ballot.

John Morgan

Taken, subscribed and sworn to before me this the 4th day of November, A.D., 1924.

Ira P. Hager

United States Commissioner as aforesaid.

Origin of Place Names in Logan County, WV (1937)

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From the Logan Banner of Logan, WV, comes this bit of history about Logan County place names:

Naming of Logan County Towns and Creeks Related By Logan Banner Reporter

While the first white settlers who entered the county near the middle of the 18th century had to have names for the creeks and runs in order to locate their homes, the children of these first settlers had to have names for each large settlement in order to have their mail delivered to them. Both groups used interesting methods of naming the landmarks.

Early Indian fighters who had contact with Boling Baker and his horse-thieving found little trouble naming the mountain which rises behind Mountain View Inn at the head of Island Creek. Because of the renegade’s custom of using one of the steep hollows for a corral, Captain William S. Madison, an early pioneer, named the mountain Horse Pen. Likewise, Gilbert Creek was named for Jim Gilbert, an Indian scout, who was killed in an Indian skirmish on that tributary of the Guyandotte. Near the place where he was killed there is an old salt lick which is named “Twisted Gun Lick.” The story is told that Gilbert, before he died, hit his gun barrel against a tree to keep the Indians from using it on his comrades. His friends, coming to the lick several hours later, found Gilbert scalped and the twisted firearm lying nearby.

Huff Creek was similarly named for a Peter Huff, whose scouting party was ambushed by a roving band of redskins and Huff was killed in the ensuing battle. They buried Huff on the banks of the creek near the present town of Mallory.

Buffalo Creek, however, received its name in an entirely different manner. The first settlers who hunted in the valley of the Guyandotte found buffalo herds so plentiful on this creek that they called it Buffalo Creek.

Dingess Run was named for a pioneer family of Dingesses which settled in its broad bottoms. William Dingess was the patriarchal head of the family and his children named the run in memory of him.

Island Creek received its name from the Indians who were awed by the beauty of a large creek flowing into the Guyandotte with such force as to cut an entirely separate bed, thus forming an island in the middle of the river. Old timers say that in the early days of the county Island Creek entered the Guyan river at the upper limits of Aracoma. Only during flood time did the creek meet the river at its present point.

As for the towns which have sprung up in the county since coal became king, many were named for prominent people living in them at one time or another or for pioneer families who lived in the towns when the coal companies first came in.

A unique method was used, however, in naming Micco. It received its name from the first letters of the Main Island Creek Coal Co., which formerly operated the mines there.

Omar was named for Omar Cole who was closely associated with the development of the town. The Cole family held, and still holds, extensive mining leases in the vicinity of that mining town.

Sarah Ann acquired its name from the wife of Colonel Edward O’Toole, who was manager of the coal company when the town applied to the government for a post office. The town is generally known as Crystal Block.

Barnabus received its name from Barnabus Curry, a pioneer settler whose home was near the town.

Stirrat was named for Colonel Stirrat, who was manager of the Main Island Creek Coal Company at one time.

Chauncey was named for Chauncey Browning, well-known son of a pioneer family who owned much of the land near that town. For many years the town of Chauncey was not large enough to be made a post office, but after the Litz-Smith Coal Company opened its mines there the town grew to proportions large enough to warrant a post office.

Dehue was given its name in honor of D.E. Hue, the first superintendent who operated the mines there.

Cham, a small place about two and one-half miles above Dehue, got its name from a Chambers family who lived on Rum Creek.

Chapmanville was named for the Chapmans, Curry for the Curry family and Aracoma for the famous Indian princess.

Source: Logan (WV) Banner, 25 March 1937

Burbus C. Dial Deed to Hollena Brumfield (1899/1909)

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B.C. Dial to Hollena Brumfield 1

Deed Book __, page ___, Lincoln County Clerk’s Office, Hamlin, WV. Hollena (Adkins) Brumfield was the daughter of Charles and Minerva (Dingess) Adkins and the wife of William “Bill” Brumfield. She is my great-great-grandmother.

B.C. Dial to Hollena Brumfield 2

Deed Book __, page ___, Lincoln County Clerk’s Office, Hamlin, WV. In the mid-1990s, Lola McCann, a daughter of Martha J. (Fry) Dial-Adkins, told me about living near the Brumfields when she was a child. Note spelling of Cole/Coal Branch.

B.C. Dial to Hollena Brumfield 3

Deed Book __, page ___, Lincoln County Clerk’s Office, Hamlin, WV. Note: The deed is dated 1909 but was certified and admitted to record in 1899.

Editorial: Blow at Coal Industry (1939)

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An Editorial: Blow at Coal Industry

We are all dependent upon the coal industry for a livelihood. Therefore anything that is injurious to the coal industry is of vital interest to us—whether we are in the newspaper business, a merchant, a clerk in a store, coal miner—or whatnot. It is a well known fact that for years, under the Roosevelt administration, reciprocal trade agreements with other countries have been striking at the very heart of the coal industry. We are all aware, too, that because of these trade agreements and because of regulatory measures, the demand for coal has been considerable less. In other words, to make a long story short, coal has been replaced to a large extent by cheap imported oils and natural gas. There was a time when high protective tariffs kept the cheap imported oils out of the United States—much to the benefit of the coal industry.

That is why it is of particular interest to refer to a recent Reciprocal Trade Agreement made with Venezuela which permits cheap imported oil to flow freely into the United States to replace coal as a fuel. John D. Battle, executive secretary of the National Coal Association, recently made some pertinent comment in regard to this agreement, that should be carefully diagnosed by all those engaged in and dependent upon the coal industry for a living. Said Mr. Battle: “The reciprocal trade agreement with Venezuela which the state department has announced is certain to increase the pressure upon Congress to terminate the entire trade treaty authorization. The Venezuela Agreement caps the climax of a tariff reduction policy which largely ignores the needs and concerns of American industry and American labor. This agreement cuts in half the existing excise tax on oil imports, notwithstanding the strong and unanimous opposition which had been registered with the state department by coal operators from coast to coast, both bituminous and anthracite, and by the United Mine Workers and by the spokesmen for the independent oil producers. Congress imposed a half-cent per gallon excise tax on oil imports in 1932 for the protection of our own fuels in our own markets. This tax so far failed to afford the needed protection that bills are now pending to increase the excise tax to 3 cents per gallon. The Venezuela Agreement not only reduces the excise tax to one-quarter cent per gallon, but ties the hands of Congress and prevents any increase in this tax so long as this trade agreement remains in force. The five per cent quota which the treaty drafters have inserted as a sugar coating is without practical effect and is a palpable subterfuge. The present taxable imports of crude and fuel oil, which come principally from Venezuela, large as they are, are nevertheless considerably below this five per cent quota limit. That means that as a result of the Venezuela Agreement oil imports may largely increase at the expense of United States coal, and at a time when the oil wells of many United States producers are shut in for want of markets. Existing oil imports represent a displacement of some ten to twelve million tons of bituminous coal annually, which takes from twelve to fifteen million dollars out of the pay envelopes of mine labor and takes more than twenty million dollars away from the railroads. Our industry will not suffer this blow in silence. We shall renew our protests to the state department and to the White House to make the record clear, and we shall carry this fight to Congress with the expectation that Congress will heed the protest and be moved to put a stop to this policy of delegating to the executive branch of the government law-making and treaty-making functions, which policy has in practice proved so destructive.”

Source: Logan (WV) Banner, 14 November 1939