Thomas H. Harvey Grave (2017)

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Judge Thomas H. Harvey grave at Spring Hill Cemetery in Huntington, WV. 16 January 2017.

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Judge Harvey, who oversaw legal matters for the 8th Judicial Circuit from 1889 until 1897, presided over the Haley-McCoy murder trial in August of 1890. 16 January 2017.

William T. Fowler

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From “Hardesty’s History of Lincoln County, West Virginia,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for William T. Fowler, who resided at Hart in Lincoln County, West Virginia:

Is a merchant, miller and farmer in Harts Creek district, with business headquarters on Guyan river at the mouth of that creek. He was born in Kanawha county, (now) West Virginia, at the mouth of Burning Spring Hollow, June 29, 1825, and his parents, Thomas and Elizabeth (Gillispie) Fowler, are both now deceased. William T. Fowler has been twice married, his first wife Polly Emerine, left him three children, born as follows: Zattoo D., March 28, 1851; Polly A., December 25, 1853; William E., September 15, 1856. In Cabell county, West Virginia, June 10, 1871, W.T. Fowler and Martha A. Adkins were united wedlock, and the children born of this union are: Bettie, May 6, 1875; Effie, June 10, 1876; Benjamin F., December 15, 1878; George W., June 30, 1880. Mrs. Fowler is a native of Cabell county, born December 15, 1839, and her parents are John B. and Elizabeth (Childers) Adkins. Her mother still resides in that county; her father died April 1876. Mr. Fowler enlisted in the Civil War in 1862, serving on the Confederate side, and was a participant in the Chapmansville battle. William T. Fowler settled in Lincoln county in 1847, and now owns 200 acres of land at the mouth of Big Hart creek, and 254 acres on Mud river. That situated on Hart creek produces well, and has a good orchard and a part is heavily timbered with oak, poplar and pine; coal and iron ore are quite abundant. The land on Mud river is heavily timbered. Address, Hart, Lincoln county, West Virginia.

SourceThe West Virginia Encyclopedia, Vol. 7 (Richwood, WV: Jim Comstock, 1974), p. 134.

Chapmanville News 03.12.1926

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An unknown local correspondent from Chapmanville in Logan County, West Virginia, offered the following items, which the Logan Banner printed on March 12, 1926:

Roses on our shoulders, Slippers on our feet,

We are Phico girls, don’t you think we’re sweet?

We are having some cold weather at this writing.

Shirl Bias was calling on Miss Ruth Jordan Sunday.

Vanzel Bentley was calling on Miss Elva Cox Sunday.

Dan Cox looks very down hearted nowadays. Wonder why?

Walter McNeely of Logan was calling on Miss Connie Bentley Sunday.

M. McNeely of Henlawson was calling on Miss Elva Godby Sunday.

Nelson Bentley had quite a lot of visitors Sunday.

J.D. Price is very ill at this writing.

Ebb Thompson was calling on Miss Vivian Johnson Sunday.

Mr. Jim Pauley was calling on Miss Katie Chapman Sunday.

Wonder why Miss Elva Cox was disappointed Saturday night.

Mrs. Annie Bias was visiting Mrs. Martha Jordan Sunday.

Wonder what has become of Miss Leta Thomas? She has not been seen for some time.

A. Wright was visiting home folks Sunday.

Bobby Hale was calling on Miss Bertha Jordan Sunday.

Wonder what has become of Miss Mary Craddock? She is never seen in our town anymore.

Alvis Godby was calling on Miss Lizzie Sansons Sunday evening.

John Addis was calling on Miss Eunice Scaggs Sunday.

We were sorry to hear of R.C. Phillips losing his white mule. Cheer up, Rube. There are plenty more.

Hartford Mounts seems to enjoy wearing his hip boots.

Daily Happenings:

Ruth had her red hat. Shirl and his new shirt. Vanzel and his overcoat. Elva and her jump jacket. Dan and his new rain coat. Walter and his smiles. Connie going to Cox’s. Markyle anad his blues. Elva and her blue dress. Nelson and his new suit. J.D. and his store. Russell looking down hearted. Sallie keeping house. Wayne and his new cook. Andy and his pictures. Grace and her sweetie. Edgar and his blues. Ebb and his sweetie. Vivian and her beau. Jim and his music. Katie and her wrist watch. Elva Cocks and her curly locks. Annie and her store. Martha and her checked dress. Brook and her chickens. Leta and her hair cut. Almond and his traveling case. Bobby and his smiles. Bertha going to the office. Mary going to school. Alvis and his watch. Lizzie and her hair clasp. John Addis and his girl. Eunice and her sweetie. R.C. Phillips and his white mule.

 

The Hearty Artisan (2016)

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Before Christmas, I visited The Hearty Artisan in Hardy, Kentucky. The Hearty Artisan features locally-crafted items of superior quality. Conveniently located on Highway 319 just outside of Williamson, WV, and situated in Hatfield-McCoy Feud country, the shop is a perfect destination for tourists seeking unique gift items.

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Photo submitted. Williamson Daily News, 10 November 2016.

 

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The Hearty Artisan, located at Hardy, KY (just outside of Williamson, WV), offers locally made one-of-a-kind items for sale. For more about the store, follow this link: http://williamsondailynews.com/news/7489/the-hearty-artisan

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Carvings by the renowned Jim Hall. Be sure to follow the shop’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/theheartyartisan/

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Tater Buddies by Jim Hall.

William Floyd Elkins

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From “Hardesty’s History of Lincoln County, West Virginia,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for William Floyd Elkins, who resided at Fourteen Mile Creek in Lincoln County, West Virginia:

Is a son of Overton and Nancy Ferguson (Estep) Elkins, who lived here at the formation of Lincoln county, and he was born in Cabell county, May 2, 1856. December 26, 1872, the Rev. John Stephens joined in wedlock, W.F. Elkins and Sarah, daughter of Alexander and Matilda Farley Dalton. Mrs. Elkins died October 15, 1875, leaving one child, Sylvanus, born October 9, 1873. In Lincoln county, July 13, 1876, Elizabeth Dennison Estep, daughter of Corbin and Bithenia Crocket (Elkins) Estep, became the wife of William Floyd Elkins, and to them one son has been given: William Overton, July 25, 1880. Elizabeth D. Elkins was born in Lawrence county, Kentucky, January 25, 1861, and came to Lincoln county with her parents in 1867. Richard Elkins, great-grandfather of William, came to the mouth of Big Hart creek, in the year 1816, and settled there, raising a large family of children, who are scattered throughout Hart Creek district. William Floyd Elkins is a farmer in this district, owning 45 acres of land on Fourteen-mile creek, 20 acres of which is cultivated. The land is well timbered and coal and iron ore abound quite largely, and there is upon the farm a lead mine, which makes the land more valuable. His post office address is Fourteen, Lincoln county, West Virginia.

SourceThe West Virginia Encyclopedia, Vol. 7 (Richwood, WV: Jim Comstock, 1974), p. 134.

Alberta Gallatin Jenkins (1900)

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Alberta Gallatin Jenkins (1861-1948) was a famous stage actress born at Green Bottom in present-day Cabell County, West Virginia. She was the daughter of Confederate general Albert Gallatin Jenkins. For more on her biography, follow this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberta_Gallatin

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Huntington (WV) Advertiser, 17 December 1900.

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Huntington (WV) Advertiser, 20 December 1900. Additional information here: https://warnerssafeblog.wordpress.com/category/alberta-gallatin-1861-1948/

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Huntington (WV) Advertiser, December 20, 1900.

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Huntington (WV) Advertiser, 21 December 1900.

Chapmanville News 03.05.1926

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An unknown local correspondent from Chapmanville in Logan County, West Virginia, offered the following items, which the Logan Banner printed on March 5, 1926:

Arnold Barker spent time last Monday and Tuesday in Huntington on business.

We noticed quite a lot of the Harts Creek boys going down to Huntington the first of the week to see the Hon. G.W. McClintie. Some of them said they did not know just when they would get back.

If we ever incorporate this town our first police is going to be a woman. We know she can make one man be good.

G.S. Ferrell has taken over the contract for grading the lower end of the hard road.

Singing school is getting a good start. It is hard to tell who makes the ugliest faces. At present, it is about a tie between Squire Barker and Morgan Garrett.

Mrs. Mart Bryant who has been quite ill for several days is some better now.

Chin Beard Lucas was dealing in real estate here Monday.

H.T. Butcher, the prohibition man, is attending federal court in Huntington this week.

John Sanders, the truant officer, was in town Tuesday.

Tucker Fry, of Toney, W.Va., was looking after the interest of the Singer Sewing Machine Co., on Tuesday here.

French Butcher says he has decided to make some stump speeches during this campaign.

Bill Thompson has purchased himself a motorcycle.

Overton Elkins

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From “Hardesty’s History of Lincoln County, West Virginia,” published by H.H. Hardesty, we find this entry for Overton Elkins, who resided at Fourteen Mile Creek in Lincoln County, West Virginia:

Is a son of Harvey and Elizabeth D. (May) Elkins, who were living here before the organization of Lincoln county. Overton Elkins was born in what was then Logan county, Virginia, December 20, 1831, and in Wayne county, March 31, 1853, by the Rev. D.K. Elkins, he was joined in marriage with Nancy Estep. She was born in Wayne county, December 25, 1838, and her parents were Corbin and Elizabeth (Davis) Estep. To Mr. and Mrs. Elkins ten children have been given: William F., born May 2, 1856; Pheribe E., May 1, 1858; Clarinda, March 18, 1860; Mary Jane, June 29, 1862; Luanna, May 30, 1864; Nancy E., March 18, 1866; Bethany C., March 9, 1868, died February 26, 1879; Emily, September 23, 1870; Erlery C., June 25, 1872; Susan R., August 10, 1877. Miles Elkins, brother of Overton, was in the late war, and served from the commencement until the close, and came home without a scar. Shadrack Estep, brother of Mrs. Elkins, served in the Confederate ranks in the war of 1861, and David J. and William O., also her brothers, were in the Federal army, 25th Virginia Regiment. William O. died soon after the close of the war from illness brought on during the service. Richard Elkins, grandfather of Overton, built the first cabin in Hart Creek district, (now) Lincoln county, about the year 1816, when Harvey, Overton’s father, was but fifteen years of age. Darby H., brother of Harvey, at the age of nine years killed a panther with a pocket knife and the assistance of his dogs. The animal measured nearly nine feet from the nose to the tip of the tail. Mr. Elkins’ mother was born January 10, 1800, and at the date of this writing (July 25, 1883) she can walk twenty miles a day. Overton Elkins is a farmer in Hart Creek district, owning 100 acres of land on Fourteen-mile creek of Guyandotte river, 30 acres under cultivation. His farm is rich and very productive, contains coal, some lead and fine building stone.

SourceThe West Virginia Encyclopedia, Vol. 7 (Richwood, WV: Jim Comstock, 1974), p. 133.